Mediterranean Streams

 
Date
Streams organized as part of the
13th Annual International Conference on Mediterranean Studies, 6-9 April 2020, Athens, Greece
Abstract Submission Information
1
6-9 April 2020
Mythology: Approaches, Theories, and Narratives
Stream Leader: Dr. Steven Oberhelman, Vice President of International Programs, ATINER & Professor of Classics, Holder of the George Sumey Jr Endowed Professorship of Liberal Arts, and Associate Dean, Texas A&M University, USA
This stream is dedicated to exploring mythological stories, figures, and narratives from all cultures of all historical periods in all countries. Papers may center on any aspect of mythology: myths and literary influences, myth and tradition, myth and science, myth and genre, myth and painting, myth and literary criticism, myth and popular culture (including cinema, television, computer games, comics, graphic novels, traditional literature, visual arts, performing arts). All theoretical approaches to mythology (for example, archaeology, cultural anthropology, psychology and psychoanalysis, structuralism, comparative analysis) are welcome.
Deadline: 24 February 2020
Abstract Submitting Form
2
6-9 April 2020
Mediterranean Studies in Asia
Stream Leader: Dr. Kyong-Son Kang, Emeritus Professor, Korea National Open University, South Korea.
The aim of the stream is to bring together academics and researchers from all areas of Mediterranean Studies, such as history, arts, archaeology, philosophy, culture, sociology, politics, international relations, economics, business, sports, environment and ecology, etc.
Deadline: 24 February 2020
Abstract Submitting Form
3
6-9 April 2020
Mediterranean and China, Past and Present: A Few Notes
Academic Responsible: Dr. Giuseppa Tamburello, Senior Lecturer, University of Palermo, Italy
The symposium is aimed at introducing the topic of China and the Mediterranean area. Seen from the actual interest of China towards the South of Europe, this symposium intends to introduce some ideas about this issue. Starting points on the matter can be many, but this panel begins from the humanities.
Deadline: 24 February 2020
Abstract Submitting Form
4
6-9 April 2020
The Mediterranean Diet in the Post Genomic Era
Academics Responsible:
Dr. Antonino De Lorenzo, Professor of Human Nutrition, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Italy.
Dr. Laura Di Renzo, Associate Professor, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Italy.

The diet of the citizens of Nicotera, the Italian pilot court where the study began in 1960, was considered the Reference Italian Mediterranean Diet. Today the considerable modifications induced in the lifestyle, with a strong impact on nutritional behavior, probably due to the acquisition of improper dietary models, contribute to the increase of chronic non-communicable diseases. In order to maintain a high nutritional quality of the diet and prevent the diet itself from becoming a vehicle for diseases, the role of the different cooking methods of food is important. The adoption of the Italian Mediterranean Diet of Reference allows to safeguard not only human health, but also protects the environment in which it lives. In our post-genomic era, the development of knowledge of the interactions between nutrients and genes has allowed us to broaden the meaning of nutrient, which can influence or regulate DNA transcription, translation into proteins or post-transductional metabolic processes. The results of our studies show how, thanks to the Nutrigenetics, Nutrigenomics, there is now the possibility of preventing the pathological event, starting from the administration of personalized Mediterranean nutritional plans. The Nutrient Analysis of Critical Control Point (NACCP) process guarantees health and nutritional Total Quality Management (TMQ) of the food, starting from the production of raw materials to the final consumer. The application of the NACCP process, allows to prepare the bases for the achievement of health claims (Regulation (EC) No. 1924/2006) for food products typical of the Mediterranean Diet, conferring the necessary health certifications, based on the scientific evidence of the data collected in the whole agro-food supply chain and in clinical trials.
Deadline: 24 February 2020
Abstract Submitting Form
5
6-9 April 2020
The Monotheistic Idea in the Mediterranean Basin
Academic Responsible:
Dr. Maria Rosaria, D’Acierno, Academic Member, ATINER & Associate Professor, Parthenope University of Naples, Italy.

This symposium wants to highlight how important is to establish a clear and fruitful relationship among people all over the world, and above all among the ones living around the shore of the Mediterranean sea. Knowing the culture of those peoples as well as their creed and faith is the starting point to eliminate prejudices and false clishés which tend to raise misunderstandings generating hate. In addition, creed and culture stimulate the learning of the languages linked to those peoples, a good way to enrich our mind and to better understand their religion.
Deadline: 24 February 2020
Abstract Submitting Form
Previous Years’ Streams
2019Tourism and the Mediterranean Countries
Academic Responsible
: Dr. Valia Kasimati, Head, Tourism, Leisure & Recreation Unit, ATINER & Researcher, Department of Economic Analysis & Research, Central Bank of Greece, Greece.
The aim of the stream is to bring together academics and researchers from all areas of Tourism in the Mediterranean basin.
Mediterranean History
Academic Responsible
: Dr. Steven Oberhelman, Professor of Classics, Holder of the George Sumey Jr Endowed Professorship of Liberal Arts, and Associate Dean, Texas A&M University, USA, Vice President of International Programs, ATINER and Editor of the Athens Journal of History.
The aim of the stream is to bring together academics and researchers from all areas of History of the Mediterranean region.
Heritage of Braudel’s Mediterranean
Academic Responsible
: Dr. Elina Gugliuzzo, Academic Member, ATINER & Professor, Pegaso University (Unipegaso), Italy.
The starting point is a reflection on the French historian and founder of the Annales school, Fernand Braudel, whose great work, The Mediterranean and the Mediterranean World in the Age of Philip II, provides a commanding overview of this region as a whole, of the forces, long-term, conjunctural and immediate, that shaped it, and of the manner in which, in the second half of the sixteenth century as much as in the first part of the twenty-first, the countries of the Mediterranean interact and engage as much with the world beyond, to the east, north and west, as they do with each other. Braudel’s inheritance on the Mediterranean area is a “must” of our historiography. But following Braudel’inheritance, other tools have to be extracted from the new trends in the social sciences and the humanities: the global perspective, but also new approaches to ecology and environmental history and studies, the development of “Border Studies” and Transnational Studies. Most of these topics and trends have been identified and intensely deployed in other parts of the world, like the Carribean, the southern border of the United States, the Indian Ocean, whereas the actual and contemporary Mediterranean seems to be too old-fashioned, too impressive, too dissuasive.
2017Beyond the Mediterranean: The Diaspora of Greek Tragedy
Academic Responsible
: Dr. Daniela Cavallaro, Senior Lecturer, University of Auckland, New Zealand.
Commenting on a recent staging of Sophocles’ Antigone in Melbourne, Australian playwright Christine Lambrianidis claimed that “Greek tragedy remains the most modern form of drama [because] it is unafraid to question everything we value”. This stream will look at the continual appeal of Greek tragedy beyond the Mediterranean countries, focusing on modern stagings and adaptations throughout the world. Papers are invited that discuss the use of Greek tragedy in fiction, comic books, theatre, opera, television and cinema beyond the Southern European area, and explore the motivation for the use of the classics for audiences that may not be familiar with them. Topics may include the use of Greek tragedy to discuss contemporary political and historical events, gender issues, post-colonial identities, social and war trauma, religious debates and ethical concerns; revisionist rewritings by women authors; adaptations in non-Western theatrical traditions and in post-dramatic theatre; new translations; productions in higher education settings; directors’ perspectives.
Nordic Origins of the Homeric Poems
Academic Responsible
: Mr. Felice Vinci, Independent Researcher, Writer, Italy.
Iliad and the Odyssey can be identified not as the Mediterranean sea, where it proves to be undermined by many incongruities, but rather in the north of Europe, is presented here. The sagas that gave rise to the two poems came from the Baltic regions, where the Bronze Age flourished in the second millennium BC and where many Homeric places, such as Troy and Ithaca, can still be identified today, not to mention the places of Odysseus’s wanderings. The seafarers who founded the Mycenaean civilization in the Aegean Sea in the 16th century B.C. brought these tales from Scandinavia to Greece after the end of the climatic optimum. They were the Homeric Iaones, Ionians coming from Sweden, who reached the Aegean area by following the River Dnieper (as the Swedish Vikings called Varangians did 2500 years after, during the Middle Ages). They rebuilt their original world, where the Trojan War and many other events of Greek mythology had taken place, in the Mediterranean, transferring significant names from north to south. Through many generations, they preserved the memory of the heroic age and the feats performed by their ancestors in their lost Hyperborean homeland, until this oral tradition was put into written form around the 8th Century BC, when alphabetical writing was introduced in Greece. This new prospect sheds light on the peoples of the northern Early Bronze Age and allows us to reconstruct their life, culture, religion and history, which have been almost totally unknown till now. Besides, this prospect is susceptible of far-reaching, unexpected developments, as for the European prehistory and the dawn of the Greek civilization.