Classical and Byzantine Studies Conference Streams

 
Date
Small Symposiums (Streams) organized as part of the
3rd Annual International Conference on Classical and Byzantine Studies, 1-4 June 2020, Athens, Greece
Abstract Submission Information
1
1-4 June 2020
The Practices of Commemoration in Classical Antiquity
Academic Responsible:
Dr. Eduard Rung, Professor, Kazan Federal University, Russia.

This theme involves a discussion of commemorative practices in classical antiquity. Commemorative practices is understood as an activity of a certain human community aimed at perpetuating certain events of special significance to it. Thus, by means of the commemoration, the foundation was laid for the subsequent representation of historical experience, the preservation in the memory of subsequent generations of information about the events that became the reason for the commemoration. Within the framework of this theme, the ancient Greek and Roman practices of commemoration will be discussed, as well as their impact on the process of preserving historical memory in subsequent epochs. The main types of commemoration will be taken into consideration: the erection of monuments, commemoration of memorable dates, as well as the transfer of information about memorial events through the organization of festivals and special events aimed at educating the younger generation. The panel focuses on a concrete historical and theoretical treatement of the practices of commemoration in antiquity and modernity.
Deadline: 20 April 2020
Abstract Submitting Form
2
1-4 June 2020
Conflict & Resolution in Literature & Culture
Academic Responsible:
Dr. Tatiana Tsakiropoulou-Summers, Director, Athens Center for Classical & Byzantine Studies (ACCBS) & Associate Professor, The University of Alabama, USA.

Self-confidence and competitiveness are much valued characteristics as agents of culture and success. If managed well, they can be very effective; their negative orientation, though, can lead to destructive conflicts. Morton Deutsch has developed a theory of conflict resolution (The Resolution of Conflict, 1973), which was later elaborated by Johnson & Johnson (Cooperation and Competition: Theory and Research, 1989) and consolidated in the 2014 edition of The Handbook of Conflict Resolution. This theory shows that its application (i) can help predict to a great extent the productive or destructive outcome of a conflict; and (ii) can suggest ways to manage most conflicts successfully. Papers in this stream will examine the application of this theory both in literary paradigms of conflict and in actual case studies of present and past conflicts between individuals, groups or nations.
Deadline: 20 April 2020
Abstract Submitting Form