Anthropology Streams

 
Date
Streams organized as part of the
4th Annual International Conference on Anthropology, 18-21 June 2018, Athens, Greece
Abstract Submission Information
1
18-21 June
2018
A Stream on “The Social Sources of Religious Fundamentalist and Anti-secularist Identity”
Stream Leaders:
Dr. David Makofsky, Acaemic Member, ATINER & Visiting Professor, Department of Sociology-Anthropology, Indiana University Northwest, USA.
Dr. Bayram Unal, Professor, Nigde University, Turkey.

The article that inspired this investigation appeared in the journal Perspectives on Politics. This is to say, the investigation began with a question of political philosophy. The questions that are addressed follow the framework laid out in the 'clash of civilizations' setting the 'Western secular humanism' against that of Islamic theorist Sayyid Qutb, the philosophic inspiration for the Muslim Brotherhood. That being said, the discussion must include a broader range of religious politics in Judaism and Christianity. Since ideas so not exist in abstract but instead are incorporated into group beliefs, we must include Sociology and Anthropology in our purview. The question before the panel begins with political philosophy and covers a broad range of subjects including comparative religion and social group analysis.
Deadline: closed
Abstract Submitting Form
2
18-21 June
2018
A Stream on “Indigenous Rights to Consultation and Self-Determination”
Stream Leader: Dr. Carlos Teodoro Jose Hugueney Irigaray, Tenure, Federal University of Mato Grosso (UFMT), and Operational Coordinator of the Interinstitutional Doctoral Program in Human Rights and Environment, UFPA / UFMT, Brazil.
Oppression has marked indigenous people’s history throughout the world, and recognition of rights happened over repeated struggles and acts of resistance. In this context, the Convention 169, emanating from the International Labor Organization in 1989, was a milestone that signified an important progress in terms of the treatment of the indigenous question, especially because the resolution enshrined the right Indigenous self-identity; denied the possibility of non-ethnic recognition by signatory States, and granted the rights of consultation and participation of these peoples in politics. Nonetheless, current local trends undermine advances in Indigenous humanitarian protection, and grants access for big development extractive projects to take place. At stake is the effectiveness of human rights, indigenous peoples and minority rights, that cannot be subtracted from procedural obstacles, normative deviations, and elitist and corporatist political maneuvering. As human science moves forward, various fields of study have to take on the responsibility to advance and widen up the knowledge on indigeneity, not only from the cultural-human point of view but also from the science-research-policy one as well; while promoting true autonomy, and the essence of the right to self-determination, undressed from idealizations, symbolisms or western value notions. This streams welcomes research papers from the scientific fields of Law, Cultural and Social Anthropology, Biology, Ecology, Human Geography, Political Science, Indigenous Education, and any other discipline that relates to the topic.
Deadline: closed
Abstract Submitting Form
3
18-21 June
2018
A Stream on “Issues in Economic Anthropology”
Stream Leader: Dr. Robert Christopher Morgan, Research Associate, Centre for Asia Pacific Initiatives, University of Victoria, Canada.
This subject has been a significant part of anthropology at least since the founding texts of B. Malinowski, R. Firth, and M. Mauss. Often founded on primary ethnographic fieldwork, research in economic anthropology has contributed greatly to developments in theory and has provided insights that are relevant across disciplines as well as to vital concerns in contemporary global life. The stream invites participant academics to give expression to this subject through current research and study.
Deadline: closed
Abstract Submitting Form