2021 Small Symposiums

  
2021 Small Symposiums Organized by ATINER

(Due to the 100% international character of our events, the terms above can be interpreted differently by each participant. To ATINER, all those terms are used interchangeably as variants of the same notion of one or more sessions which are thematic and are organized as part of one of our general (non-thematic) conferences. If you want to organize such a thematic event, please review our policy and guidelines, for more details)

Abstract Submission Information
1
4-7 January 2021
Architecture
as part of the 8th Annual International Conference on Humanities & Arts in a Global World
Academics Responsible:
Dr. Nicholas N. Patricios
, Vice President of Strategic Planning & Analysis, ATINER and Professor & Dean Emeritus, School of Architecture, University of Miami, USA.
Dr. Clara Germana Gonçalves, Head, Architecture Unit, ATINER & Researcher, CITAD (Centro de Investigação em Território, Arquitectura e Design), Lusíada University and Associate Professor, ISMAT (Instituto Superior Manuel Teixeira Gomes), Portugal.
The aim of the symposium is to bring together academics and researchers from all areas of Architecture.
Deadline: 31 August 2020
Abstract Submitting Form
2
4-7 January 2021
History & Archaeology
as part of the 8th Annual International Conference on Humanities & Arts in a Global World
Academics Responsible:
Dr. Steven Oberhelman
, Professor of Classics, Holder of the George Sumey Jr Endowed Professorship of Liberal Arts, and Associate Dean, Texas A&M University, USA, Vice President of International Programs, ATINER and Editor of the Athens Journal of History.
Dr. Nicholas Pappas, Vice President of Academic Membership, ATINER & Professor of History, Sam Houston University, USA.
The aim of the symposium is to bring together scholars and students of all areas of history, archaeology and other related disciplines.
Deadline: 31 August 2020
Abstract Submitting Form
3
4-7 January 2021
Education
as part of the 8th Annual International Conference on Humanities & Arts in a Global World
Academic Responsible:
Dr. John Spiridakis
, Co-Editor, Athens Journal of Education & Professor, St. John University, USA and Dr. Alexander Makedon, Head, Education Unit, ATINER & Independent Scholar (Retired Full Professor, Chicago State University, USA).
The aim of this symposium is to bring together scholars and students of Education, Pedagogy, and other related disciplines in order to discuss all aspects and latest developments within the related fields. These areas of research include history, sociology, philosophy, psychology, economics of education, education policies and laws, science education, and even media, communication and technology studies, race and ethnic studies, feminist and cultural studies, and every conceivable scientific area that pertains to all levels of education – primary, secondary and higher.
Deadline: 31 August 2020
Abstract Submitting Form
Papers to be Presented
4
4-7 January 2021
Philosophy
as part of the 8th Annual International Conference on Humanities & Arts in a Global World
Academics Responsible:
Dr. Patricia Hanna
, Head, Philosophy Unit of ATINER & Professor, University of Utah, USA.
The aim of the symposium is to bring together academics and researchers of philosophy.
Deadline: 31 August 2020
Abstract Submitting Form
Papers to be Presented
5
4-7 January 2021
Literature
as part of the 8th Annual International Conference on Humanities & Arts in a Global World
Academics Responsible:
Dr. Stamos Metzidakis
, Head, Literature Unit, ATINER & Professor Emeritus of French and Comparative Literature, Washington University in Saint Louis, USA & Adjunct Professor of French, Hunter College-CUNY, USA.
The aim of the symposium is to bring together academics and researchers from all areas of literature and other related disciplines.
Deadline: 31 August 2020
Abstract Submitting Form
Papers to be Presented
6
4-7 January 2021
Languages & Linguistics
as part of the 8th Annual International Conference on Humanities & Arts in a Global World
Academic Responsible:
Dr. Valia Spiliotopoulos
, Head, Languages & Linguistics Unit, ATINER and Instructor, Department of Language and Literacy Education, The University of British Columbia, Canada.
The symposium is soliciting papers (in English only) from all areas of languages, linguistics and other related disciplines.
Deadline: 31 August 2020
Abstract Submitting Form
7
4-7 January 2021
Computer Art
as part of the 8th Annual International Conference on Humanities & Arts in a Global World
Academics Responsible:
Dr. Pascal Jollivet, Head, Computer Unit, ATINER & Associate Professor, Université de Technologie de Compiègne / Sorbonne Université, France.
Dr. Panos Petratos, Vice-President of Information Communications Technology, ATINER & Fellow, Institution of Engineering and Technology & Professor, Department of Computer Information Systems, California State University, Stanislaus, USA.
Dr. Stephen Andrew Arbury, Head, Arts & Culture Unit, ATINER & Professor of Art History, Radford University, USA.
The symposium is soliciting papers (in English only) from all areas of Computer and Digital Art such as: Graphic software, Robot painting, Neural style transfer, Computer-generated visual media, Computer generated 3D still imagery, Computer generated animated imagery, Digital installation art, etc.
Deadline: 31 August 2020
Abstract Submitting Form
8
4-7 January 2021
Who Are The Greeks? The Evolution of Greek Identity Over The Ages
as part of the 8th Annual International Conference on Humanities & Arts in a Global World
Academic Responsible:
Dr. Tatiana Tsakiropoulou-Summers, Director, Athens Center for Classical & Byzantine Studies (ACCBS) & Associate Professor, The University of Alabama, USA.
Since their earliest writings, Greeks grappled with the question of identity, aware that the different Greek tribes belonged in a Hellenic ἔθνος (nation) and declaring succinctly to the world that “πᾶς μὴ Ἕλλην βάρβαρος”, every non-Greek is a barbarian. Nevertheless, they were also aware that each Greek tribe’s unique characteristics kept it separate from other Greeks. Throughout their long history, the Greeks struggled to self-define as Hellenes but also link themselves to other nations, in the way the Romans brunched out in the West, creating kindred nations and cognate languages throughout Europe. But for the Greeks, this did not happen. Despite the long-lasting hold and influence their language and culture had in the East, the closest they ever came to it was Percy Shelley’s declaration “We are all Greeks”, acknowledging that Western laws, literature, religion and arts have their roots in Greece. At the same time, Greece being at the crossroads between East and West, with one “leg” in Europe and another in Asia Minor, a historically Greek region, they have oscillated culturally and politically between Eastern and Western leanings, influences and affections, even throughout the Byzantine period and up to the modern age. The struggle seemed to be “settled” when a Greek politician famously declared in 1977, “Ανήκομεν εἰς τήν Δύσιν”, we belong in the West. Yet, as if to prove him wrong, the Greeks have not stopped repeating the self-identification as “ανάδελφον έθνος”, a nation without any kindred races anywhere in the world. Therefore, for this symposium, we are looking for papers that will address the question of Greek identity, ancient and modern, as well as the impact of definitions.
Deadline: 31 August 2020
Abstract Submitting Form
9
3-6 May 2021
Shadow Economy and Criminal Activity: Social Changes and Response Policies
as part of the 8th Annual International Conference on Business, Law & Economics
Academics Responsible:
Dr. Manuela Pulina
, Associate Professor, University of Sassari, Italy.
Dr. Maria Gabriela Ladu, Lecturer, University of Sassari, Italy.
The twenty-first century has brought new challenges for business, laws and economics. The underground economy and criminal activities, together with economic turmoil, globalisation, inequalities pose new threats for individuals’ well-being in both developed and developing countries. Public institutions, police activity and communities need to assess and monitor social and economic trends and impacts driven by the illegal business and criminal activity. This session will bring together the latest research on the illegal use of the territory and the implications in terms of social effects and governance.
Deadline: 5 October 2020
Abstract Submitting Form
10
17-20 May 2021
Educational Leadership
as part of the 23rd Annual International Conference on Education
Academic Responsible: Dr. Denver J. Fowler, Associate Professor of Educational Leadership & Policy Studies, Southern Connecticut State University, USA.
The aim of the symposium is to bring together academics and researchers related to Educational Leadership.
Deadline: 19 October 2020
Abstract Submitting Form
11
17-20 May 2021
New Trends in Arabic Language and Literacy Teaching
as part of the 23rd Annual International Conference on Education
Academic Responsible: Dr. Jessica Tsimprea Maluch, Assistant Professor, American University in Dubai, UAE.
The aim of this symposium is to bring together scholars and researchers from a variety of backgrounds to present their research on current pedagogy for Arabic language and literacy development, with a specific goal to inform teacher professional development and best practices. Research implications and implications for practice will be discussed.
Deadline: 19 October 2020
Abstract Submitting Form
12
31 May &
1-3 June 2021
Who Are The Greeks? The Evolution of Greek Identity Over The Ages
as part of the 4th Annual International Conference on Classical and Byzantine Studies
Academic Responsible:
Dr. Tatiana Tsakiropoulou-Summers, Director, Athens Center for Classical & Byzantine Studies (ACCBS) & Associate Professor, The University of Alabama, USA.
Since their earliest writings, Greeks grappled with the question of identity, aware that the different Greek tribes belonged in a Hellenic ἔθνος (nation) and declaring succinctly to the world that “πᾶς μὴ Ἕλλην βάρβαρος”, every non-Greek is a barbarian. Nevertheless, they were also aware that each Greek tribe’s unique characteristics kept it separate from other Greeks. Throughout their long history, the Greeks struggled to self-define as Hellenes but also link themselves to other nations, in the way the Romans brunched out in the West, creating kindred nations and cognate languages throughout Europe. But for the Greeks, this did not happen. Despite the long-lasting hold and influence their language and culture had in the East, the closest they ever came to it was Percy Shelley’s declaration “We are all Greeks”, acknowledging that Western laws, literature, religion and arts have their roots in Greece. At the same time, Greece being at the crossroads between East and West, with one “leg” in Europe and another in Asia Minor, a historically Greek region, they have oscillated culturally and politically between Eastern and Western leanings, influences and affections, even throughout the Byzantine period and up to the modern age. The struggle seemed to be “settled” when a Greek politician famously declared in 1977, “Ανήκομεν εἰς τήν Δύσιν”, we belong in the West. Yet, as if to prove him wrong, the Greeks have not stopped repeating the self-identification as “ανάδελφον έθνος”, a nation without any kindred races anywhere in the world. Therefore, for this symposium, we are looking for papers that will address the question of Greek identity, ancient and modern, as well as the impact of definitions.
Deadline: Open
Abstract Submitting Form
13
7-10 June 2021
The Transmission and Maintenance of Diaspora Identity Through time and Generation
as part of the 12th Annual International Conference on Visual and Performing Arts
Academic Responsible:
Dr. Maria-Irini Avgoulas, Academic Member, ATINER & Associate Lecturer La Trobe University Australia.
Diaspora communities with their specific cultural identity are found throughout the world and exist on a continuum of redevelopment as they evolve. The experience of diaspora identity and the transmission of memory culture that supports identity maintenance may vary by generation, the original migrants and their descendants born in diaspora. Diaspora community members of all generations may maintain a sense of nostalgia but also negative emotions of not belonging to either their original homeland or the host community. This may be expressed as having two homelands and, in a sense, belonging to both. While potentially enriching, diaspora identity may in fact be more like belonging nowhere and being a stranger in both cultures. This may represent a negative emotion associated with the experience of migration and acculturation despite the generation of membership. This session will explore the transmission and maintenance of diaspora identity through time and generation and consider how associated psychosocial factors and the recreated social environment of the culture of origin may influence wellbeing and the experience of illness that are significant factors in overall health as well as the promotion of health and wellbeing in diaspora.
Deadline: Open
Abstract Submitting Form
14
14-17 June 2021
The Economic, Medical, Political, Cultural Effects of Covid-19
as part of the 9th Annual International Conference on Politics
Academic Responsible:
Jan Reid, Academic Member, ATINER & President, Coast Economic Consulting, USA.
The goal of the symposium is to analyze all of the effects of the COVID-19 virus and the lock-down. We are particularly interested in the Economic, Medical, Political, and Cultural effects of COVID-19
Deadline: Open
Abstract Submitting Form
14
5-8 July 2021
Language of Politics
as part of the 14th Annual International Conference on Languages & Linguistics
Academic Responsible:
Dr. Marija Liudvika Drazdauskiene, Academic Member, ATINER & Professor, Wszechnica Polska, Higher School in Warsaw, Poland.
The aim of the symposium is to discuss the purposes and targets of communication in politics and to disclose the role of language in achieving them. As politics means “the art and practice or running or governing a country” and managing “relationships between governments of different political parties and systems”, communication in politics always involves weighing, balancing and negotiating (Dictionary of Government and Politics, p. 210). It has been known since Aristotle that the matters of politics include five subjects: ways and means, war and peace, national defence, imports and exports and legislation (Aristotle. Rhetoric, Book I. 4, 15-25). Political speeches and writing relate to the art of speaking, which means that the authors have to mind “in any given case, the available means of persuasion” (Aristotle. Rhetoric, I.2, 26-30). Therefore the language of politics requires a masterful use of language which shows an informed mind, confidence of a leader and the skill of a speaker/writer. Political communication “urges somebody to do or not to do something” (Aristotle. Rhetoric, I.3, 5-10). On the one hand, political communication requires the knowledge of facts and political correctness, and on the other, the persuasive presentation of an argument. The political speaker or writer has to appeal to his colleagues, who are his equals, to the electorate, who have to be addressed on their level of knowledge, and to the supporters, who have to be convinced of the required action. That is why the language of politics encompasses the complete potential of a language, the mastery of psychology and rhetorical skills. It involves the broadest spectrum of verbal means. Like requirements to an orator in classical antiquity, the language of politics requires the broadest familiarity with subjects, language functions and the choice of words.
Deadline: 7 December 2020
Abstract Submitting Form
15
12-15 July 2021
Russian Legal Discours
as part of the 18th Annual International Conference on Law
Academic Responsible:
Dr. Vladimir Orlov, Academic Member, ATINER & Professor, Herzen State Pedagogical University of Russia, Russia.
Legal discourse as a concept covers issues related to law that is characterized as being an artifact. Its substance, though, due its continuity and discreteness, is properly undetermined and constantly changing, exists in law in the form of legislation or legisprudence and legal practice or jurisprudence that are supported by auxiliary phenomena including legal science and other sciences related to law. The Russian legal discourse is quite different to what is generally represented as the western legal discourse. The purpose of the symposium is to offer academic opportunities to make presentations and discuss broadly without strict dogmatic boundaries on the issues related to Russian law.
Deadline: 14 December 2020
Abstract Submitting Form