Law Panels & Streams

 
Date
Panels & Streams organized as part of the
16th Annual International Conference on Law, 15-18 July 2019, Athens, Greece
Abstract Submission Information
1
15-18 July 2019
Implementing Human Rights
Stream Leader:
Professor Assaf Meydani, Academic Member, ATINER & Dean of the School of Government and Society, The Academic College of Tel-Aviv–Yaffo, Israel.

The stream is designed to be a dynamic gathering of human rights and social justice activists, advocates, practitioners seeking to broaden our knowledge in understanding the process by which social issues become human rights issues for incorporation into legal standards; in identifying the factors influencing the interpretation of those standards; and in their compliance, implementation, and enforcement at the international and national levels.
Deadline: 3 June 2019
Abstract Submitting Form
2
15-18 July 2019
Water Law
Stream Leader:
Dr. Ronald Griffin, Academic Member, ATINER & Professor, Florida A&M University, USA.

The aim of the stream is to bring together academics and researchers form all areas of law related to water resources (International and National Water Law) such as: Water Rights and Allocations, Water Quality Law, Drainage Law, Water Conservation Order, Groundwater Law, etc.
Deadline: 3 June 2019
Abstract Submitting Form
3
15-18 July 2019
State and Law in the Interwar Period
Stream Leader:
Dr. Varga Norbert, Associate Professor, Faculty of Law, University of Szeged, Hungary.

The purpose of the interdisciplinary miniature stream is to introduce such legal institutions that have an effect on the development of the legal systems of different countries and are much in evidence in the contemporary legal reforms related to the foundation of the modern state and law in the interwar period. The combined examination of history and law can draw the attention of the legislators and legal historians of the 20th and 21st Century to the importance of such legal institutions which, if observed from the point of view of legal history, can assist modern codification. The historical legal institutions appearing in the law currently in effect, with the aid of a certain legal “restoration”, can help their understanding, however it does not simply require some sort of theoretical, dogmatic examination but also the analysis of the legal practice and the praxis. Due to the topic (State and Law in the Interwar Period) of the interdisciplinary stream, this may not only be interesting for people working in the field of law or legal history, but can also get the attention of historians and scientists and researchers working on other, various fields. Through the complex and comparative assessment of the different branches of law, we can come up with a general picture on the development and the role in contemporary legal development of each and every legal institution.
Deadline: 3 June 2019
Abstract Submitting Form
4
15-18 July 2019
Liability for Self-driving Vehicles
Stream Leader:
Dr. Natasa Tomic-Petrovic, Academic Member, ATINER & Associate Professor, Faculty of Transport and Traffic Engineering, University of Belgrade, Serbia.

t is considered that self-driving vehicles resistant to human errors will be the first great transport revolution of the 21st century. The greatest obstacle to self-driving vehicles is the legal frame. For instance, if the vehicle is not driven by a human being, then, in case of an accident, responsibility could burden the manufacturer of the self-driving operating system of the car. The issue of privacy protection of the owner is also important, because sensitive personal data contained in the system could be misused. Another important issue is the sociological dimension of the use of such vehicles.
Deadline: 3 June 2019
Abstract Submitting Form
5
15-18 July 2019
Law and Aesthetics: Bodies, Power and Sexuality
Stream Leader:
Dr. Anna Chronopoulou, Academic Member, ATINER & Senior Lecturer in Law, The University of Westminster, UK.

Much academic ink has been spilt over the relation between law and aesthetics. An aestheticized aspect of law focuses on the way in which subjectivities are constructed in the public domain. Many academic accounts from a number of disciplines have been concerned with this focus for a number of years. For instance, feminist accounts have always been concerned with issues of female subjectivities construction as up against the construction of male subjectivities. Issues of female sexuality have formed huge part of the construction of female identities and femininities. More recently, issues of race begin to provide a different perspective on the construction of female subjectivities. This stream examines the way in which femininities and masculinities are constructed, forged, formed and shaped through the dialectics of power and the dynamics of bodily representations. It puts forward a comparative approach in the way subjectivities are constructed on celluloid as opposed to the way that are constructed in the public domain.
Deadline: 3 June 2019
Abstract Submitting Form